Posts Tagged ‘platform’

Sunday, February 27th, 2011

Flash Molehill is coming and Unity will be targeting it for export.  Unity states that they will allow it as an export option just like there are mobile options for iOS and Android.

These are exciting times. Today, at the Flash Gaming Summit in San Francisco (of which we’re proud Gold Sponsors), Adobe has announced the public availability of a beta version of the Flash Player, codenamed Molehill, that has a very interesting new feature: hardware accelerated 3D support.

Molehill exposes a very low-level shader-based interface to the graphics hardware. Adobe has decided to focus on that low-level part, and do that really well. The molehill pre-release will not be shipping with a 3D engine, scene building tools, model and animation importers / exporters, physics, lighting or lightmap creation tools, etc.

The article states that Unity will be keeping the Unity Player and the developer will decide when to target Flash or Unity Players or other platforms like desktop, mobile that are currently available and use the rendering platforms that work best with each (DirectX/OpenGL/OpenGL ES/Molehill… maybe WebGL in the future).

There is no announcement of a date but Unity is pretty fast to add updates and new platform versions so if they take this on they will ship. Currently they mention using Unity and coding with AS3 within Unity script or using Mono.NET C#/Javascript/Boo as currently used. An intersting option is using Unity to create content and code in C#/Javascript over AS3.

Unity addresses these issues here:

Q. Is this the end of the Unity’s own Web Player?

Absolutely not. The Flash and Unity Web Players both have their strengths.  We’re excited by the opportunity to target the Flash Player and all of its features with Unity, but there will be plenty of experiences that the Unity plugin is better suited for. It will be up to developers in the end, to decide whether they want to target only the Flash Player, only the Unity Web Player, or some combination of the two (now things are getting interesting!)

Q. What programming language will I use?

You’ll have two options:

  1. For people with a Flash background:
    Target our ActionScript API directly from Flash. Think:
    var go:GameObject = new GameObject(“Just normal ActionScript 3 code”);
  2. For people with a Unity background:
    Script your content in C# / JavaScript / Boo, like you’re used to, and have Unity automatically translate it to ActionScript when you hit publish.

Adobe is good to move to a model where hardware acceleration is part of the platform.  Since Molehill is low level and competing products like Unity, WebGL, and others would take that in time, opening it so others can build tools on their platform will attract interesting new developments like this.

Wednesday, June 23rd, 2010

Wow. IE9 just set it in motion.

Canvas 2D is now really on the horizon for all browsers. IE9 preview now supports the <canvas> tag and all canvas element APIs and most Canvas 2D context APIs and attributes!

Features Available

  • Canvas
    • In the latest Platform Preview we support all Canvas element APIs and most Canvas 2D Context APIs and attributes.

Features Partially Implemented

  • Canvas
    • globalCompositeOperation
      • The latest Platform Preview does not include support for the globalCompositeOperation attribute.
    • DOM Exceptions
      • The latest Platform Preview does not include support for Canvas 2D Context DOM Exceptions.
    • drawFocusRing()
      • The latest Platform Preview does not include support for the drawFocusRing() Focus management API.

This is pretty amazing even though it has been hinted at by other news (previously from AMD).  Why should we care what Internet Explorer is up to?  Well the dream of standards across web browsers seems to be materializing for html5 and more importantly, canvas 2d.

Even with Silverlight Microsoft has decided to join the party and upgrade the web on some great standards to build even more innovative platforms on top of.  Some may see this as a death knell for Silverlight, Flash etc but I do not see it that way. I see <canvas> as a competing interactive technology but many times technologies bind together for a better experience, they also drive one another to innovate.

Much like Silverlight pushed Flash, and Silverlight was created because of Flash, those two technologies brought on canvas 2D and more graphical capabilities for the web in the interactive, game and application space.  As javascript execution has sped up so has the graphical capabilities of browsers now. What is not to like about that if you are an interactive developer?

Canvas, Flash, Silverlight are all for the most part still software/CPU accelerated. The question is who will start the hardware acceleration of canvas and competing technologies even further to bring us closer to OpenGL ES/WebGL in the browser?

Ars Technica states that IE9 will have hardware accelerated canvas in addition to SVG but that doesn’t seem to be officially stated anywhere by Microsoft yet that I can find.  AMD has hinted at it and previous news about SVG being hardware acclerated.  Time will tell and it will be a HUGE boost to the browsers that do, of course we need all of them to do it to be worthwhile for mainstream content.

Ars on the hardware accelerated canvas support:

What does come as a surprise is canvas support. Microsoft has been promoting Internet Explorer 9′s support of SVG, which provides vector graphics capabilities within the Web browser, but thus far has kept quiet when asked if it would support the canvas bitmap graphics specification. Not only is canvas being supported, it is also being hardware accelerated, continuing Microsoft’s efforts to give Web applications the ability to exploit the extensive hardware capabilities of modern PCs.

Of course we should tread carefully here, there is still a big chance that portions of the canvas 2d spec will not be implemented exactly the same or some browser may have missing features much like CSS and javascript evolution.  For instance the “most Canvas 2D Context APIs and attributes” is something I hope is addressed in the final IE9. If you are gonna spend the time implementing a standard, do it fully and right, don’t try to break it (an old Microsoft tactic). But this step was needed to again push interactive web technologies to more closely compete with desktop graphic technology which adds some really exciting times ahead.

Another golden ray of hope is ES5 support in IE9.  Again Wow!

Sunday, June 1st, 2008

The Alternativa Platform has officially launched. It is a 3d engine for Flash/AS3. It has been announced on their blog today and this is an exciting development for 3d in flash, especially if you are a game developer or game company.

They have offered it free for non-commercial use in the form of SWC files. It is well oganized and lots more good stuff to come it seems in the GUI and some information on setting up the gaming platform on the server as well. It looks to be a complete package.

This is not an open source release but the Alternativa Platform is an extremely well done and amazing looking engine. It has configurations for 3d and isometric 3d.

Here is a shot from the engine.

Sputnik has been launched!

Here are all the classes in the package (SWC):

All Classes

Alternativa3DLabel
Alternativa3DVersion
BitmapUtils
Box
Camera3D
CameraController
ColorUtils
Cone
Engine3DError
Face
FaceExistsError
FaceNeedMoreVerticesError
FaceNotFoundError
FillMaterial
FPS
GeoPlane
GeoSphere
InvalidIDError
KeyboardUtils
Loader3DS
Map
Material
MathUtils
Matrix3D
Mesh
MeshUtils
MouseUtils
Object3D
Object3DHierarchyError
Object3DNotFoundError
ObjectExistsError
ObjectNotFoundError
ObjectUtils
Plane
Point3D
Scene3D
Set
Sphere
Surface
SurfaceExistsError
SurfaceMaterial
SurfaceNotFoundError
Texture
TextureMaterial
TextureMaterialPrecision
TextUtils
Vertex
VertexExistsError
VertexNotFoundError
View
WireMaterial
Saturday, May 17th, 2008

I have been consuming all the great additions to Flash 10 this weekend and one that really jumps out after you get past the visual, text and sound features (which are spectacular btw and most of what the community was asking for). But one feature snuck by, this is the one that ByteArray (Thibault Imbert) mentions/pointed out for managing files directly within Flash.

File Reference runtime access — Bring users into the experience by letting them load files into your RIA. You can work with the content at runtime and even save it back when you are done through the browse dialog box. Files can be accessed as a byteArray or text using a convenient API in ActionScript without round-tripping to the server. You no longer have to know a server language or have access to a server to load or save files at runtime.

This greatly lowers the bar to using Flash as a photo editor, document manager, customized application experiences, marking up content and saving locally, all without the need for server side script. I am a big fan of server side technologies and develop with them but even for bettering performance this could be huge.

Scenarios where this might be useful is editing applications, note taking (download a book with your notes), editors for docs/games/3d/textures,,, the possibilities are endless really.

Flash 9 just got mainstream and production ready (flash 9 penetration) at the tail end of last year but there are so many great things in the new version that I hope it comes out very soon. Flash it turning into quite a platform.

Alternativa Platform also has updated their engine for Flash 10 already (they must have had some inside early accessibility to it) and there are great possibilities here.

It is only beta (Flash 10) but there are great market opportunities to prepare for when this launches. Keep your eye on where the puck will be, not where it is currently at. I was concerned when Adobe bought Macromedia and the future of Flash but it appears they are taking this bull by the horns.

If you are ready to play with Flash 10 here is Flex and FlashDevelop updates to help you get started.

Also here is some code posted at ByteArray from Pleh for testing the new FileReference runtime access, usage is extremely simple and rests on this

var data:ByteArray = fileRef['data'];

/*
  FileReference Load Example By Pleh 17/05/08
*/

package {
	import flash.display.Loader;
	import flash.display.Sprite;
	import flash.events.Event;
	import flash.events.MouseEvent;
	import flash.net.FileReference;
	import flash.net.FileFilter;
	import flash.utils.ByteArray;

	public class Flash10Test extends Sprite
	{
		private var fileRef:FileReference;

		public function Flash10Test()
		{
			fileRef = new FileReference();
			fileRef.addEventListener(Event.SELECT, selectFile);
			fileRef.addEventListener(Event.OPEN, openFile);
			stage.addEventListener(MouseEvent.CLICK,stageClick);
		}

		private function selectFile(e:Event):void {
			fileRef['load']();
		}

		private function openFile(e:Event):void {
			var data:ByteArray = fileRef['data'];
			var loader:Loader = new Loader();
			loader.loadBytes(data);
			addChild(loader);
		}

		private function stageClick(e:Event):void{
			fileRef.browse([new FileFilter("All Formats (*.jpg,*.gif,*.png,*.swf)", "*.jpg;*.gif;*.png;*.swf", "JPEG;jp2_;GIFF;SWFL")]);
		}

	}
}